Q

Anonymous asked:

Where do you go to school??

A

Central Michigan University

Please come tomorrow! #speakout #abortion #provoice

jessehimself:

It’s an old custom in the United Kingdom that when a visitor sees a money tree, he wedges in his own spare change. When you hammer in your coin, you make a wish. These trees are literally covered in the wishes of strangers. Most of the money trees are in Cumbria in West England and Portmeirion, along the Afon Glaslyn River in Wales. The tradition goes back to 18th century Scotland when florins were hammered into trees with a prayer to take away sickness.
text provided by http://www.wimp.com/oldtree/






jessehimself:

It’s an old custom in the United Kingdom that when a visitor sees a money tree, he wedges in his own spare change. When you hammer in your coin, you make a wish. These trees are literally covered in the wishes of strangers. Most of the money trees are in Cumbria in West England and Portmeirion, along the Afon Glaslyn River in Wales. The tradition goes back to 18th century Scotland when florins were hammered into trees with a prayer to take away sickness.
text provided by http://www.wimp.com/oldtree/






jessehimself:

It’s an old custom in the United Kingdom that when a visitor sees a money tree, he wedges in his own spare change. When you hammer in your coin, you make a wish. These trees are literally covered in the wishes of strangers. Most of the money trees are in Cumbria in West England and Portmeirion, along the Afon Glaslyn River in Wales. The tradition goes back to 18th century Scotland when florins were hammered into trees with a prayer to take away sickness.
text provided by http://www.wimp.com/oldtree/






jessehimself:

It’s an old custom in the United Kingdom that when a visitor sees a money tree, he wedges in his own spare change. When you hammer in your coin, you make a wish. These trees are literally covered in the wishes of strangers. Most of the money trees are in Cumbria in West England and Portmeirion, along the Afon Glaslyn River in Wales. The tradition goes back to 18th century Scotland when florins were hammered into trees with a prayer to take away sickness.
text provided by http://www.wimp.com/oldtree/






jessehimself:

It’s an old custom in the United Kingdom that when a visitor sees a money tree, he wedges in his own spare change. When you hammer in your coin, you make a wish. These trees are literally covered in the wishes of strangers. Most of the money trees are in Cumbria in West England and Portmeirion, along the Afon Glaslyn River in Wales. The tradition goes back to 18th century Scotland when florins were hammered into trees with a prayer to take away sickness.
text provided by http://www.wimp.com/oldtree/






jessehimself:

It’s an old custom in the United Kingdom that when a visitor sees a money tree, he wedges in his own spare change. When you hammer in your coin, you make a wish. These trees are literally covered in the wishes of strangers. Most of the money trees are in Cumbria in West England and Portmeirion, along the Afon Glaslyn River in Wales. The tradition goes back to 18th century Scotland when florins were hammered into trees with a prayer to take away sickness.
text provided by http://www.wimp.com/oldtree/

jessehimself:

It’s an old custom in the United Kingdom that when a visitor sees a money tree, he wedges in his own spare change. When you hammer in your coin, you make a wish. These trees are literally covered in the wishes of strangers. Most of the money trees are in Cumbria in West England and Portmeirion, along the Afon Glaslyn River in Wales. The tradition goes back to 18th century Scotland when florins were hammered into trees with a prayer to take away sickness.

text provided by http://www.wimp.com/oldtree/

(via yoursocialconstructsareshowing)

evilfeminist:

Zero trust in male midwives or gynecologists

(via iamayoungfeminist)

look at how fucking cute my little is. 

Representin the Penguin Family

I’m obsessed.

Aghhhh this is so creepy. Even when I decide it’s time to have kids, I think my gut reaction to pictures like this will be “GET THIS THING THE FUCK OUT OF ME.” 

It’s like an alien growing inside you… So weird. 

I mean, it’s kind of cool that I have the ability to grow another human inside me.

But also gross and weird.

Aghhhh this is so creepy. Even when I decide it’s time to have kids, I think my gut reaction to pictures like this will be “GET THIS THING THE FUCK OUT OF ME.”

It’s like an alien growing inside you… So weird.

I mean, it’s kind of cool that I have the ability to grow another human inside me.

But also gross and weird.

My flash broke 😣. Kinda fixed it with a rubber band. Kinda.

Where can I watch American Horror Story?

Fooooh freee?

alittlebitnerdy:

I shall build a shrine to Kim and North with this image…..

baptistes:

thefakeoriginal:

Same

This is like the funniest picture ive seen in my humble 19 years of life

(via compromised-emotionally)

iamayoungfeminist:

So excited for this event, but even more excited that the lovely Jan Wilberg is coming back to CMU. She is one of my mentors and such an incredible woman. I hope to see you all there! #feminism #abortion #provoice

The event my student group is putting on! 

Working on a poster design for SAPA’s Walk a Mile in Their Shoes event.

Q

suchhypocrates asked:

Hey ! I wanted to know, only if it doesn't bother you to answer me, what do you think of the medias portrayals of adopted kids ? I find it weird how most of them hate their adoptive parents/absolutely want to meet their biological mothers, but I'm not personnaly adopted so I don't really know, what about you ?

A

Yeah, most media representations are terrible. For myself and most other adoptees I have spoken to, biological parents are more of a curiosity than some deep connection.

The only cases where I frequently see adoptees that feel a need to find their birth parents are in trans national or trans racial adoptees. I think their search for their birth parents is more of a search for their “roots,” but you would have to ask them.